kalikardashian:

thelilnan:

OH FOR FUCK’S SAKE

OKAY

AJAX SOAP

image

THEIR SLOGAN IS “STRONGER THAN GREASE”

AND I WAS LIKE OKAY YEAH MAKES SENSE FOR A DISH SOAP- WAIT

AJAX WAS A GREEK SOLDIER RENOWNED FOR HIS STRENGTH

AJAX IS STRONGER THAN ALL OF GREECE

someone who worked at ajax has literally waited 66 years for you to get this

(via jehantho)

682,126 notes

bayoread:

myrtlewilson:

judedeluca:

myrtlewilson:

none of your mythological faves were even remotely straight like welcome 2 the real world jackass hercules had a fuckton of anal sex

People believe what they choose to.

it’s literally not a matter of belief there is literally a vase with a painting of zeus fucking his cupbearer ganymede while ganymede is holding a dildo like u can’t just not believe in thousand year old pottery

image

(via shepherdpie)

180,589 notes

soloontherocks:

bellonanj73:

the-writers-ramblings:

i cant even make it past the table of contents im laughing too hard

What book is this? I must have this because of reasons? 

friends don’t let friends bang cows

(Source: thewritersramblings, via ayunthefrog)

254,656 notes

exitpursuedbyasloth:

mmanalysis:

darkjez:

chadmsicard:

I dig this for a couple of reasons.
First, it’s got great style.
Perhaps more interestingly though, is that it’s a very different tone as far as the direction of aggression. Most people know the Clash of the Titans version where she’s  on the hunt for him once he shows up. But let’s face it, Medusa really gets the shaft from destiny overall. She starts out as a priestess in a temple who gets raped by Poseidon and gets cursed for it as if it was all her fault. The result is that she’s basically doomed to live without human contact for eternity. Then she’s hunted down specifically for her head by a demigod whose got all sorts of great toys and backing to get the job done and depicted as some sort of horrible monster for defending her turf from folks out to kill her.
There are some really interesting theories about regarding just what the whole ‘gorgon’ thing was really about from a historical perspective. It’s really quite a tragic tale about the rise of patriarchy and the purge of goddess-centric worshipers. There are also parallels to the Apollo versus Typhon story which is part of the same era. Harsh.
See, even the demystified stories from ancient times are fascinating!
deviantart:

Medusa by *MattRhodes


Reblogging for commentary. 

I wish there were more nuanced portrayals of Medusa than as just a scary, snake lady.

Not to mention all this shit went down while she was pregnant with twins, the Pegasus and the giant Chrysaor, as a result from the rape. Perseus would mount Pegasus, and use him and Medusa’s head to kill a sea monster, thus winning him a wife, Andromeda. Medusa was cursed by the very goddess she served, Athena, who also gave Perseus the mirrored shield he used to slay her. Raped, betrayed by her god, hunted down like a beast in her own home while she was pregnant, her own children stolen from her and used to glorify and aide her killers and betrayers. And she’s supposed to be the monster?

exitpursuedbyasloth:

mmanalysis:

darkjez:

chadmsicard:

I dig this for a couple of reasons.

First, it’s got great style.

Perhaps more interestingly though, is that it’s a very different tone as far as the direction of aggression. Most people know the Clash of the Titans version where she’s  on the hunt for him once he shows up. But let’s face it, Medusa really gets the shaft from destiny overall. She starts out as a priestess in a temple who gets raped by Poseidon and gets cursed for it as if it was all her fault. The result is that she’s basically doomed to live without human contact for eternity. Then she’s hunted down specifically for her head by a demigod whose got all sorts of great toys and backing to get the job done and depicted as some sort of horrible monster for defending her turf from folks out to kill her.

There are some really interesting theories about regarding just what the whole ‘gorgon’ thing was really about from a historical perspective. It’s really quite a tragic tale about the rise of patriarchy and the purge of goddess-centric worshipers. There are also parallels to the Apollo versus Typhon story which is part of the same era. Harsh.

See, even the demystified stories from ancient times are fascinating!

deviantart:

Medusa by *MattRhodes

Reblogging for commentary. 

I wish there were more nuanced portrayals of Medusa than as just a scary, snake lady.

Not to mention all this shit went down while she was pregnant with twins, the Pegasus and the giant Chrysaor, as a result from the rape. Perseus would mount Pegasus, and use him and Medusa’s head to kill a sea monster, thus winning him a wife, Andromeda. Medusa was cursed by the very goddess she served, Athena, who also gave Perseus the mirrored shield he used to slay her. Raped, betrayed by her god, hunted down like a beast in her own home while she was pregnant, her own children stolen from her and used to glorify and aide her killers and betrayers. And she’s supposed to be the monster?

(via tumblkage)

70,920 notes

I feel like such a moron for not noticing this sooner

cincosechzehn:

Calliope is the name of the Muse of Epic poetry, who is always seen with a scroll and/or writing implements.

Caliborn is a rendering of the Latin name for Excalibur, a legendary sword.

The pen is mightier than the sword.

(via rockerfox999)

1,572 notes

benito-cereno:

Mythursday Mythuesday: A-ing More Qs
Let’s do another one why not.
mindless-entertainment asks:
“I just saw Wrath of the Titans cause I was bored, and it made me wonder: How come Hades is usually cast as a villain in pop culture? I remember him not really being evil in the original stories.”
I often joke that Hades is basically just Strong Sad, the quiet, artistic, lonely one of a trio of brothers, but this is largely to counter the idea that he’s some kind of evil greedmaster who only wants to kill babies or whatever.
The fact is, while Hades is stern and unwavering, he is hardly a villain. He is a loyal brother who always fights on Zeus’s side, 100% of the time, and that is, like, the main thing. Don’t do what Zeus wouldn’t do. And Hades always doesn’t do what Zeus wouldn’t do. And he definitely doesn’t do a lot of things Zeus definitely wouldn’t not do. So in some ways, he is nicer than Zeus.
He’s not really even in that many stories, to be honest. When he shows up, he might be an obstacle—you know, in the way that death might be for someone—but he’s never antagonistic.
For example, when Orpheus shows up in the Underworld looking for Eurydice, Hades ultimately shows mercy and leniency where he doesn’t have to, and does nothing more than keep his word when Orpheus breaks their agreement.
From Demeter’s perspective, Hades might seem the villain when he kidnaps her daughter Persephone (I did a Mythursday on this a long time ago, maybe you can find it), but the fact is Hades was acting with the consent of Zeus, Persephone’s father, who was also, as it happens, the supreme lawgiver for all gods and men. And, yes, white vanning your child bride is the sign of a hella creeper in modern society, but everything turned out pretty okay for Hades and Persephone, or as well as things can go for people whose job is to look at ghosts in a cave all day.
So why is Hades a villain so often in modern portrayals of Greek mythology? Because people are scared of death, I suppose. And I’m sure it doesn’t help that Christians got him all mixed up with Satan in their minds, all thinkin Hades and Hell are synonymous.
But death is not even the main source of villainy in ancient mythology. The most common antagonists—monsters, giants, Titans—are villains because they represent a pre-Greek barbarism that it is the duty of the civilized Olympian gods and their offspring to tame.
Other villain-defining traits are hubristic acts such as setting yourself equal to or better than a god, or overstepping your social bounds. You could interpret Hera’s jealousy this way: she thinks she knows better than he does, and so she acts against Zeus’s wishes time and again (obviously this is super problematic to modern eyes). But, yes, Hera is the villain WAY more than Hades. She’s the evil queen in the stories of Heracles, Aeneas, Io, Echo, and probably dozens more. This hubris is also the downfall of characters such as Pentheus, Salmoneus, Niobe, Arachne, and some of the most famous tenants of the Underworld, Sisyphus and Tantalus.
The other big no-no is the breach of xenia, the code of hospitality that was one of the central tenets of Greek society. Be a good host; be a good guest; this is the most important thing. The entire Trojan War was fought because Paris was a shitty guest (ETIQUETTE TIP: Do not steal your host’s wife). Ixion was a shitty guest and he famously burns in the Underworld for his rape-based faux pas.
All of these things would be considered way worse than being a glum dude who looks at skeletons all day.
If there’s any god who should be a recurring villain, it’s Ares. Even the other gods hated him (except, notably, for Aphrodite), as he represented mindless bloodshed and the gross but necessary parts of war that we don’t like to think about.
But, no, it’s poor old Hades every time. Sorry, bro. It’s not your fault.

benito-cereno:

Mythursday Mythuesday: A-ing More Qs

Let’s do another one why not.

mindless-entertainment asks:

I just saw Wrath of the Titans cause I was bored, and it made me wonder: How come Hades is usually cast as a villain in pop culture? I remember him not really being evil in the original stories.”

I often joke that Hades is basically just Strong Sad, the quiet, artistic, lonely one of a trio of brothers, but this is largely to counter the idea that he’s some kind of evil greedmaster who only wants to kill babies or whatever.

The fact is, while Hades is stern and unwavering, he is hardly a villain. He is a loyal brother who always fights on Zeus’s side, 100% of the time, and that is, like, the main thing. Don’t do what Zeus wouldn’t do. And Hades always doesn’t do what Zeus wouldn’t do. And he definitely doesn’t do a lot of things Zeus definitely wouldn’t not do. So in some ways, he is nicer than Zeus.

He’s not really even in that many stories, to be honest. When he shows up, he might be an obstacle—you know, in the way that death might be for someone—but he’s never antagonistic.

For example, when Orpheus shows up in the Underworld looking for Eurydice, Hades ultimately shows mercy and leniency where he doesn’t have to, and does nothing more than keep his word when Orpheus breaks their agreement.

From Demeter’s perspective, Hades might seem the villain when he kidnaps her daughter Persephone (I did a Mythursday on this a long time ago, maybe you can find it), but the fact is Hades was acting with the consent of Zeus, Persephone’s father, who was also, as it happens, the supreme lawgiver for all gods and men. And, yes, white vanning your child bride is the sign of a hella creeper in modern society, but everything turned out pretty okay for Hades and Persephone, or as well as things can go for people whose job is to look at ghosts in a cave all day.

So why is Hades a villain so often in modern portrayals of Greek mythology? Because people are scared of death, I suppose. And I’m sure it doesn’t help that Christians got him all mixed up with Satan in their minds, all thinkin Hades and Hell are synonymous.

But death is not even the main source of villainy in ancient mythology. The most common antagonists—monsters, giants, Titans—are villains because they represent a pre-Greek barbarism that it is the duty of the civilized Olympian gods and their offspring to tame.

Other villain-defining traits are hubristic acts such as setting yourself equal to or better than a god, or overstepping your social bounds. You could interpret Hera’s jealousy this way: she thinks she knows better than he does, and so she acts against Zeus’s wishes time and again (obviously this is super problematic to modern eyes). But, yes, Hera is the villain WAY more than Hades. She’s the evil queen in the stories of Heracles, Aeneas, Io, Echo, and probably dozens more. This hubris is also the downfall of characters such as Pentheus, Salmoneus, Niobe, Arachne, and some of the most famous tenants of the Underworld, Sisyphus and Tantalus.

The other big no-no is the breach of xenia, the code of hospitality that was one of the central tenets of Greek society. Be a good host; be a good guest; this is the most important thing. The entire Trojan War was fought because Paris was a shitty guest (ETIQUETTE TIP: Do not steal your host’s wife). Ixion was a shitty guest and he famously burns in the Underworld for his rape-based faux pas.

All of these things would be considered way worse than being a glum dude who looks at skeletons all day.

If there’s any god who should be a recurring villain, it’s Ares. Even the other gods hated him (except, notably, for Aphrodite), as he represented mindless bloodshed and the gross but necessary parts of war that we don’t like to think about.

But, no, it’s poor old Hades every time. Sorry, bro. It’s not your fault.

(via rockerfox999)

47 notes

solarbeans:

wantstobelieve:

Sort of Middle Eastern Thor & Loki? Idek guys I was just looking for an excuse to draw a half-naked Loki

No doubt inspired by joannaestep’s awesome African version of Thor & Loki (x)

HOT A WHAT

(via rockerfox999)

5,565 notes